Review: Tsarina by Ellen Alpsten


Tsarina by Ellen Alpsten

Publication Date: May 14, 2020
Bloomsbury Publishing

I didn't realize that I needed to read more historicals set in Russia until I read Tsarina by Ellen Aplsten! My word, this book was a wild, sexy ride through Peter the Great and Catherine I's reign, and I loved every minute of it!

I'm a huge fan of the darker side of history and the more debauchery, the better and Tsarina had all of that in spades! Catherine I begins life as a young girl named Marta living with her siblings and father in a small, run-down shack when she is sold off to a man to become his servant which sets off a series of events that will leave Marta used and abused and passed to other men until she finally meets Tsar Peter. Their marriage and the ungodly amount of children that Catherine bore is detailed as well, which was fascinating!

Tsarina will immediately grab you from the first page and will leave you breathlessly turning the pages to see what will happen next. If you're sensitive to violence and sexual scenes this book may not be for you but I thought it was an exceptional read about a woman that rose from a life of servitude to become the first woman to rule Imperial Russia. An absolutely stellar read, I was highly impressed that this was Alpsten's debut novel. I will definitely be on the lookout for her future books!

Review

⭐⭐⭐⭐

I didn't realize that I needed to read more historicals set in Russia until I read Tsarina by Ellen Aplsten! My word, this book was a wild, sexy ride through Peter the Great and Catherine I's reign, and I loved every minute of it!

I'm a huge fan of the darker side of history and the more debauchery, the better and Tsarina had all of that in spades! Catherine I begins life as a young girl named Marta living with her siblings and father in a small, run-down shack when she is sold off to a man to become his servant which sets off a series of events that will leave Marta used and abused and passed to other men until she finally meets Tsar Peter. Their marriage and the ungodly amount of children that Catherine bore is detailed as well, which was fascinating!

Tsarina will immediately grab you from the first page and will leave you breathlessly turning the pages to see what will happen next. If you're sensitive to violence and sexual scenes this book may not be for you but I thought it was an exceptional read about a woman that rose from a life of servitude to become the first woman to rule Imperial Russia. An absolutely stellar read, I was highly impressed that this was Alpsten's debut novel. I will definitely be on the lookout for her future books!

About the Author



Ellen Alpsten was born and raised in the Kenyan highlands, before attending L'Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris. Whilst studying for her Msc in PPE she won the Grande École short story competition with her novella Meeting Mr. Gandhi and was encouraged to continue writing. Upon graduating, she worked as a producer and presenter for Bloomberg TV in London. She contributes to international publications such as Vogue, Standpoint and Conde Nast Traveller. Tsarina is her first novel. She lives in London with her husband and three children.



Review & Giveaway: Monarchs Under the Sassafras Tree by Lillah Lawson


Monarchs Under the Sassafras Tree by Lillah Lawson

Publication Date: September 20, 2019
Regal House Publishing
eBook & Paperback; 384 Pages

Genre: Historical Fiction/Southern


It's an unusually warm autumn, 1929, and O.T. Lawrence is about as content as a cotton farmer can be in Five Forks, Georgia. Nothing—not poverty, drought, or even the boll weevi—can spoil the idyllic life he shares with his doting wife and children and his beloved twin brother Walt. Until illness and Black Tuesday take everything O.T. ever held dear in one fell swoop. Grieving, drinking, and careening toward homelessness, O.T. is on the brink of ending it all when he receives an odd letter from a teenage acquaintance, the enigmatic Sivvy Hargrove, who is locked away in Milledgeville’s asylum for the insane. Traveling through desperate antebellum towns, O.T. and his daughter Ginny are determined to find Sivvy and discover her story. Set against the backdrop of the Great Depression, Monarchs Under the Sassafras Tree is a love story to Georgia and the spirit of its people—a story of family, unconditional love, poverty, injustice, and finding the strength inside to keep on going when all is lost.

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound

Praise

“Lillah Lawson spins a yarn that’s wonderful in its knottiness. Monarchs Under the Sassafras Tree is a historical Southern fable about butterflies, biscuits and the healing power of family, both biological and chosen. The images are evocative, the dialogue rough and realistic, the emotions achingly real. A must-read.” —Lauren Emily Whalen, author of Satellite

"A hauntingly beautiful story, full of twists and tragedy, rich in detail and told with gorgeous lyrical flair… A deeply moving, unforgettable read.” —Alice Hayes, author of The Thread that Binds

“An exquisite read, with the tender yet gritty undertones of Steinback, Monarchs Under the Sassafras Tree is a solemn walk through the deep south during one of the most difficult eras in American history: the early twentieth century. Lawson captures the southern gothic through the often fragile, yet always hopeful hearts of her characters as they try to cope with the hard knocks of life. This book will touch your heart in the beautifully tragic way that only southern gothic can, slowly at first, and then all at once.” —Melanie Cossey, author of A Peculiar Curiosity

Review

⭐⭐⭐⭐

My amazing reading streak continues with Lillah Lawson's Monarchs Under the Sassafras Tree! Called a "love story to Georgia", Lawson's incredible historical is set around and during the Great Depression in Five Forks, Georgia. I'm a Southern girl and live about 30 minutes away from the setting of the book so I knew I had to pick it up, and I am so glad that I did!

Told with authentic voices that really bring you into their world and set the scene, readers will quickly be caught up in the lives of O.T. and Sivvy. I don't want to give too much away, but I will warn you to have tissues at the ready. This time in history in the South wasn't easy and Lawson portrays the hardships families had to endure with masterful writing and characters you won't easily forget.

I thoroughly enjoyed my first read by Lillah Lawson and can't wait to read what she has coming out next!

About the Author



Lillah Lawson has been writing since she was 8 years old, when she won a short story contest at her elementary school. The story was about a Princess who gets tired of waiting for the Prince to show up and saves herself. Once she saw her words printed in the local newspaper, she knew she wanted to be a writer.

Having written professionally as well as dabbling in poetry, children's books and blogging, Lillah finally completed her first novel, Aroha, as part of a NaNoWriMo challenge in 2012.
She lives in Georgia, in the United States, with her partner and son and three rambunctious animals. She is currently working on another novel.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, May 18
Review at Passages to the Past

Tuesday, May 19
Interview at Jorie Loves A Story
Feature at Books in their Natural Habitat

Wednesday, May 20
Interview at The Book Junkie Reads

Thursday, May 21
Review & Excerpt at Bookworlder

Friday, May 22
Review at Nursebookie
Feature at View from the Birdhouse

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we are giving away a paperback copy of Monarchs Under the Sassafras Tree! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 22nd. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Paperback giveaway is open to the US only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud will be decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or a new winner is chosen.

Sassafras Tree


Interview & Giveaway: The Baroness of New York by Anya Silverthorne

Happy Monday, dear readers! It's a busy day today on the blog and first up is an interview with Anya Silverthorne who is currently on blog tour for her novel, The Barnoness of New York! We also have a giveaway for a copy of the book so be sure to enter because it's an amazing read!


Hello Anya and welcome to Passages to the Past! Thanks so much for stopping by today to talk about The Baroness of New York!

To begin, can you please tell us a little about yourself and your writing?

I write under a penname, so I do try to keep my own name a bit distant from my other writing. It’s not because I’m ashamed of it, I just want it to be a little bit more clear. Also, people can be a bit closed minded when it comes to what historians are supposed to be like, so thinking of one who writes romance books might be a bit wild for them.

At any rate, I’m a historian and hold a PhD (in a different time period from this novel and the worlds that are waiting to be written) and work as both a professional writer and teaching about my area of expertise.

I’ve written a few fiction works under my own name in addition to my academic stuff.

What inspired you to write The Baroness of New York?

Oh gosh. So, the story itself has excited for years and years, it’s just never been written down as a novel. It’s based on a fanfiction of a film I had started when I was really young. What inspired me to write this now is a friend of mine who told me to think about writing indie romances. She works in the industry herself and thought it might be a great thing for me to try. As I already had this story (and many more!) in my back pocket, I thought it was a good debut.

What research did you undertake when writing The Baroness of New York?

There wasn’t anything massive as the focus is more on the characters than ensuring every little detail is accurate to the time period. But, I did ask a friend who is a hobbyist in this time period in New York a lot of questions, as well as turned to a couple of books and documentaries. And there were lots of Internet searches about things like the proper terminology for underwear, the legality of intermarriage in New York state, prewar German titles, etc. Oh, and of course figuring out when alarm clocks were invented, and when things like toilets and indoor plumbing became en vogue for the wealthy.

What would you like readers to take away from reading The Baroness of New York?

I think the theme that love is complicated is a major one. But I do want to highlight how fascinating life in New York City was at that time. To think a woman like Adele and a man like Nick would meet then was probably mind-blowing to their families just a couple of generations ago. And I think as always, there’s an undertone of social justice commentary in most of my writing, even if it is supposed to be more entertaining than educational.

What was your favorite scene to write?

I liked the scene when Adele met all of Nick’s friends. There are so many stories between that group of friends that I’ll be sharing later in their own books and novellas. It was fun to have them meet, and to have her as a bit of a fish out of water.

What was the most difficult scene to write?

To be honest, the sex scenes. I’ve never written a sex scene before in anything formal. A friend who helped me on it did comment that it is a bit too technical, but it’s a difficult thing to get right. You want it to be sexy without being too cliché about “heaving bosoms” but also not a sex-ed class.

When did you know you wanted to be a writer?

Probably as a child. I always started historical fiction novels and never finished them in elementary school, but I always knew I wanted to write.

What does your daily writing routine look like?

There isn’t one, to be honest. I usually set a daily goal for myself when I’m trying to finish a book. With fiction books, it’s easier to write more. With non-fiction, it takes a bit longer so the goals are less lofty.

What has been your greatest challenge as a writer? Have you been able to overcome it?

My confidence. I was represented by a traditional agency for a while and my confidence plummeted after a book of mine didn’t sell. It seemed like everything I wrote for years was wrong. I still have a twinge of feeling like everyone else knows grammar better than I do, or knows style better than I do and that my novels are sophomoric compared to everyone else’s.

Who are your writing inspirations?

I don’t know that I have anyone in particular. I really like Jennifer S. Brown and Martha Hall Kelly’s work. Both write historical fiction, so definitely check them out if you haven’t!

What was the first historical novel you read?

Probably any one of the American Girl books. The first non-American girl books I can really remember reading that were historical were the Laura Ingalls Wilder books.

What is the last historical novel you read?

Auschwitz Lullaby by Mario Escobar

What are three things people may not know about you?

Everything since I’m writing under a pen!

What appeals to you most about your chosen genre?

I find the way people used to live fascinating. But when we study history, we tend to focus on the big picture. I like to learn about how real people grappled with their social constraints and what was then, modern events and technology.

What historical time period do you gravitate towards the most with your personal reading?

The time period I work on professionally. But then, I also like the Victorian and Edwardian eras, obviously!

What do you like to do when you aren't writing?

Travelling, hanging out with my partner and dog, piddling around with graphic design (totally something I have no training in, but I’ve been having fun working on it for Baroness), reading, going to the movies and to the theater.

Lastly, what are you working on next?

The sequel to this book. But also a little surprise I’ll reveal next month. Subscribe to my mailing list to hear more about it *Wink wink*

Sounds exciting! I'm looking forward to hearing more about the reveal! Thank you for taking the time to be here with us today!


The Baroness of New York by Anya Silverthorne

Publication Date: May 1, 2020
Platen Press

Genre: Historical Romance/Victorian


Baroness Adele von Mueller learns the sweetest love is forbidden....

Baroness Adele von Mueller

It's 1903 and free-spirited 18-year-old Baroness Adele von Mueller has just arrived to live with her spinster aunt in New York City. After a previous impropriety tarnishes her reputation with the German nobility, her father sends her overseas to give her one last chance to marry into money and save the family's name. Instead, Adele finds herself falling for charming and wickedly handsome Nick Mason, the foreman of a paper factory, who is as gorgeous as he is poor. As family secrets are revealed, Adele learns there's much more riding on her marrying wealthy than just keeping the family's name...

Nick Mason

Nick Mason has a habit of falling in love with every girl he sees. An orphan, former newspaper seller and now a foreman at a paper mill, he's nursing a bruised heart after being dumped by a laundry girl. But when he meets Baroness Adele disguised on a night out as a maid in her family's house, he knows right away there's something different about her. Once she reveals her true identity, he's even more intrigued. Nick has fallen for white women before, but never one so wealthy, and never one he knew he couldn't live without. With most people firmly against their love, he must visit her in secrecy to make their romance blossom.

Nick and Adele must stand up to a society and a family that won't accept their love for what it is: true and enduring. Can they withstand the storm, or will they be forced apart by a deck that's stacked against them in this steamy Victorian romance?

This historical interracial romance/Victorian romance novel marks Anya Silverthorne's debut.

Available on Amazon


About the Author

Anya Silverthorne makes her debut with The Baroness of New York. She enjoys writing fiction about the late Victorian and early Edwardian era. In "real life," she is a historian of a completely different time period.

Follow her on social media to stay connected, and up-to-date with new releases, giveaways, and more.

Instagram: @anyasilverthorne
Twitter: @anyasilverthorn
Facebook: @anyasilverthorne

Want news delivered straight to your inbox? Join her mailing list.

Blog Tour Schedule

Friday, May 1
Review at Passages to the Past

Sunday, May 3
Review at Carole Rae's Random Ramblings

Monday, May 4
Review at A Chick Who Reads

Tuesday, May 5
Review at Bitch Bookshelf
Excerpt at I'm All About Books

Wednesday, May 6
Excerpt at What Is That Book About

Thursday, May 7
Review at Mommy In Color

Friday, May 8
Review at Gwendalyn's Books

Sunday, May 10
Guest Post at A Darn Good Read

Monday, May 11
Review at YA, It's Lit

Tuesday, May 12
Excerpt at Donna's Book Blog

Wednesday, May 13
Review at Books and Zebras

Thursday, May 14
Guest Post at To Read, Or Not to Read

Friday, May 15
Feature at Chicks, Rogues and Scandals

Monday, May 18
Interview at Passages to the Past

Thursday, May 21
Review at Books in their Natural Habitat

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we are giving away a paperback copy of The Baroness of New York! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 21st. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Paperback giveaway is open to the US only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud will be decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or a new winner is chosen.

Baroness of New York


Review & Giveaway: Man of War by T.J. London


Man of War by T.J. London

Publication Date: April 14, 2020
Paperback & eBook; 681 Pages

Series: The Rebels and Redcoats Saga, Book #4
Genre: Historical Fiction


The man who wants everything gets nothing…

July 1755

War is brewing between England and France. Impressed into the Royal Navy, Lieutenant Merrick, against all odds, advanced through the ranks to become an officer—but he is not a gentleman. A man with a tainted past from a traitorous family, cast down by King George—a stain no man can remove.

Merrick’s thrust into the role of captain, when the HMS Boudica is attacked by pirates off the coast of Nova Scotia. On a captured enemy vessel he discovers a King’s ransom in treasure and a woman chained in the hold from passenger ship that mysteriously disappeared at sea.

Beautiful, defiant, and hell bent on revenge, India makes a deal with Merrick to uncover the pirates’ scheme, promising him everything he desires: fortune, glory, and the chance to bring honor back to the McKesson name.

Now, they race against time to uncover a plot that links those in the highest ranks of the British aristocracy, to a failed rebellion that is once again trying to topple the monarchy and place an old pretender on the throne. But all that glitters is not gold as passions stir and an impossible love blooms, threatening to undermine all Merrick and India have done to protect their King and a country on the brink of war.

Available on Amazon


Review

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

I guess it's good that's it's Friday because I am courting a massive book hangover today! I stayed up late last night to finish up Man of War by TJ London and it was totally and utterly worth it! I will apologize upfront because there is no way my review will do this book justice.

I am a huge fan of London's Rebels and Redcoats series and have loved every book, but I think this one might be my favorite yet! The series has everything that makes a historical novel perfect - history, action, adventure, romance, and intrigue. The book kicks off instantly with action as Merrick and his men battle the French aboard the British ship, the HMS Boudica, and Merrick becomes Captain when the last one perishes in the fight.

When we meet Caroline she is being held prisoner in the hull of the ship after being kidnapped while on her way to meet her betrothed, horrifically treated by her captors and shackled. She is rescued by Merrick and his men and he promises to help bring her abusers to justice.

What London does best is to create characters that are multi-faceted and complex - they aren't black and white/good or evil. They have flaws which make them easier to relate to and to endear yourself to. Merrick and India were amazing characters! Merrick is hardened but with a big heart who is making the best out of the life that was thrust upon him.

"I never wanted to be a warrior. I should like to have known peace, but that was not my destiny."

Caroline/India is a fascinating woman - tough yet vulnerable, and stubborn as all hell, which I loved about her but dang that woman could be frustrating! Ha!

"There's no winning for a woman. Without her virtue, she's nothing, but when it's stolen from her, she is even less-even in death."

The secondary characters are just as intriguing, and of course, the HMS Boudica is a character all in herself. And what a ship she is!

London's writing is always stellar but this book is next level amazing! The amount of research she did just on the Naval ship alone must have been staggering!

I could not love this book more and highly, highly recommend this entire series! I could see this book being a fantastic movie. Paging Netflix!

About the Author

T.J. London is a rebel, liberal, lover, fighter, diehard punk, and pharmacist-turned-author who loves history. As an author her goal is to fill in the gaps, writing stories about missing history, those little places that are so interesting yet sadly forgotten. Her favorite time periods to write in are first and foremost the American Revolutionary War, the French Revolution, the French and Indian War, the Russian Revolution and the Victorian Era. Her passions are traveling, writing, reading, barre, and sharing a glass of wine with her friends, while she collects experiences in this drama called life. She is a native of Metropolitan Detroit (but secretly dreams of being a Londoner) and resides there with her husband Fred and her beloved cat and writing partner Mickey.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads


Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, April 27
Guest Post at A Darn Good Read

Tuesday, April 28
Review at Gwendalyn's Books

Wednesday, April 29
Excerpt at Donna's Book Blog

Thursday, April 30
Interview at The Book Junkie Reads

Friday, May 1
Review at Books, Writings, and More

Saturday, May 2
Feature at Just One More Chapter

Monday, May 4
Review at History + Fiction + Adirondack Spirit

Tuesday, May 5
Feature at The Lit Bitch

Wednesday, May 6
Feature at I'm All About Books

Thursday, May 7
Guest Post at Curling up by the Fire

Friday, May 8
Review at Hoover Book Reviews

Saturday, May 9
Feature at Reading is My Remedy

Monday, May 11
Review at andreajanel_reads

Wednesday, May 13
Feature at What Is That Book About

Thursday, May 14
Excerpt at Books In Their Natural Habitat

Friday, May 15
Review at Passages to the Past

Giveaway

To enter to win an amazing prize pack from T.J. London, please complete the Gleam form below!

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 15th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Paperback giveaway is open to the US only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud will be decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or a new winner is chosen.

Man of War


Review: Camelot by Giles Kristian


Camelot by Giles Kristian


Publication Date: May 14, 2020
Bantam Press

Genre: Historical/Arthurian

Following his acclaimed Sunday Times bestseller, Lancelot , Giles Kristian’s new novel returns us to the realms of Arthurian legend...

Britain is a land riven by anarchy, slaughter, famine, filth and darkness. Its armies are destroyed, its heroes dead, or missing. Arthur and Lancelot fell in the last great battle and Merlin has not been seen these past ten years. Now, the Saxons are gathering again, their warbands stalk the land, their king seeks dominion. As for the lords and kings of Britain, they look only to their own survival and will not unite as they once did under Arthur and his legendary sword Excalibur.

But in an isolated monastery in the marshes of Avalon, a novice of the order is preparing to take his vows when the life he has known is suddenly turned upside down in a welter of blood. Two strangers - the wild-spirited, Saxon-killing Iselle and the ageing warrior Gawain - will pluck the young man from the wreckage of his simple existence. Together, they will seek the last druid and the cauldron of a god. And the young man must come to terms with his legacy and fate as the son of the most celebrated yet most infamous of Arthur’s warriors: Lancelot.

For this is the story of Galahad, Lancelot’s son – the reluctant warrior who dared to keep the dream of Camelot alive...

Review

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

My absolutely top favorite read of 2018 was Giles Kristian's Lancelot so you can bet that I've been counting the days until the next book was released. I actually read Lancelot twice and was gushing so much that the author graciously sent me a Lancelot hat 😀

Yet when I held the copy Camelot in my hands at last I was heistant to start it, because I know once I started it I was closer to finishing it and I knew I wouldn't want it to end. And I was right. These books are pure perfection! And of course, I read Camelot while wearing my Lancelot hat 😀

Camelot picks up 10 years after the end of Lancelot. The Saxons are ravaging Britain and a young man is training to be a Monk at Ynys Wydryn, where they protect the Holy Thorn from the Saxons. That young man happens to be Lancelot's son, Galahad. He has been with the Monks since Lancelot died in battle. Without Arthur and his men Britain has fallen to the Saxons and their raiding troops steal and kill at will. When Gawain, a warrior who fought with Arthur, shows up at Ynys Wydryn and tells them that Galahad needs to come with them, that they have found Merlin, and have a plan to save Britain, Galahad must decide between his duty to his brothers, and his fate as the son of the greatest warrior in Britain.

"A man can't hide from the future, no more than he can hude from the past."

It's impossible to describe how I feel when I am reading this series. They are magical, which sounds cheesy to say, but they are. I feel like I'm on an Epic quest in a world of Gods, sacred trees, healing waters, and magical realms. It's like how I feel when I watch Lord of the Rings or Game of Thrones.

I'm pretty sure Camelot will be my top read this year. I cannot begin to explain how much I love these books. A massive thanks to Bantam Books and Anne Cater for the chance to read Camelot. I will be reading these books over again for years to come and recommending them to everyone!

About the Author


Family history (he is half Norwegian) and a passion for the fiction of Bernard Cornwell inspired Giles Kristian to write. Set in the Viking world, his bestselling Raven and The Rise of Sigurd trilogies have been acclaimed by his peers, reviewers and readers alike. In The Bleeding Land and Brothers’ Fury, he tells the story of a family torn apart by the English Civil War. He also co-wrote Wilbur Smith’s No.1 bestseller, Golden Lion. In his most recent novel, the Sunday Times bestseller Lancelot, Giles plunged into the rich waters of the Arthurian legend. For his next book, he continues his epic reimagining of our greatest island ‘history’. Giles Kristian lives in Leicestershire.


Review & Giveaway: Of Darkness and Light by Heidi Eljarbo


Of Darkness and Light by Heidi Eljarbo

Publication Date: May 12, 2020

Series: Soli Hansen Mysteries, #1
Genre: Historical Mystery


In this first book of a new historical mystery series, a young art historian faces a tough choice in German-occupied Norway.

“Artful prose and at a pace that makes for a can't-put-down, first-class literary voyage."–Melissa Dalton-Bradford, bestselling author of Global Mom

Oslo, 1944. Soli Hansen’s passion for art history is and always has been a way of life for her. While she spends her days working in an art shop, WWII is taking its toll on everyone. Apprehensive of the consequences, Soli avoids becoming entangled in the war resistance efforts. She closes her eyes in hopes the enemy will retreat and leave her beautiful country for good.

But when a woman is found dead in the alley alongside the art shop and a painting from the last auction goes missing, Soli is thrown into the thickest of the fray involving both Nazi art theft and the Norwegian resistance.

Once Soli finds her courage, there’s no turning back. Her personal life is turned upside-down with danger, lies, spying, and an incredible discovery.

In this dual timeline novel, Heidi Eljarbo paints a vivid picture of what people are willing to do in desperate times. With unforgettable characters and rich historical details, Of Darkness and Light will keep the reader mesmerized until the last satisfying page.

Perfect for fans of Kate Morton, Lucinda Riley, Katherine Neville, and Kate Mosse.

Available on Amazon

Praise for Of Darkness and Light

“Interspersing love, hope, and courage, the participants are drawn together in mysterious paths.”–Pauline Isaksen, bestselling author of Dying for Justice

“Of Darkness and Light will reel you in and keep you hooked until the end.”–Mette Barfelt, bestselling author of The Solvik Series

Review

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Soli Hansen is cycling home when she's stopped and warned that the Germans have invaded her small town in Norway. They are now at war and her life as she knows it is forever changed. Four years later she is working at an art shop when the lady who cleaned there is killed mysteriously. Is it linked to a seemingly amateur work of art that her boss recently purchased and was the lady who she said she was?

Soli's quiet and passive life is flipped upside down when she delves deeper into the murder and the identity of the art work. Nazis are stealing valuable pieces of art from Norway and the Jewish people and Soli can't bear to see that happen. Teaming up with a local Policeman and then working with a resistance art club she works with them to figure out the mystery behind the painting, and how to keep it safe.

In addition to Soli's timeline we also go back further in time to early 1600's Malta and the life of the artist Caravaggio and his love affair with Fabiola Ruber.

Of Darkness and Light is the first in this new series by Heidi Eljarbo and I absolutely will be counting the days until the next one is released. I inhaled this in one sitting, it's just that good! You have got to pick this up - you can thank me later!

About the Author

Heidi Eljarbo is the bestselling author of Catching a Witch. She grew up in a home filled with books and artwork and she never truly imagined she would do anything other than write and paint. She studied art, languages, and history, all of which have come in handy when working as an author, magazine journalist, and painter.

After living in Canada, six US states, Japan, Switzerland, and Austria, Heidi now calls Norway home. She and her husband have a total of nine children, thirteen grandchildren--so far--in addition to a bouncy Wheaten Terrier.

Their favorite retreat is a mountain cabin, where they hike in the summertime and ski the vast, white terrain during winter. Heidi's favorites are family, God's beautiful nature, and the word whimsical.

If you would like to know more, please visit Heidi's website. You can also follow her on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Goodreads.

Blog Tour Schedule

Tuesday, May 12
Review at Passages to the Past

Thursday, May 14
Review at Gwendalyn's Books

Friday, May 15
Feature at What Is That Book About

Monday, May 18
Review at A Chick Who Reads

Tuesday, May 19
Feature at Reading is My Remedy

Thursday, May 21
Review at 100 Pages a Day

Monday, May 25
Review at Foals, Fiction, and Filligree

Monday, June 1
Review at History + Fiction + Adirondack Spirit

Tuesday, June 2
Interview at Jorie Loves A Story

Wednesday, June 3
Review at Jessica Belmont
Review at Chicks, Rogues and Scandals

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we are giving away one copy of Of Darkness and Light in paperback! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on June 3rd. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Paperback giveaway is open internationally.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud will be decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or a new winner is chosen.

Of Darkness and Light


Review: & Giveaway: A Girl Called Foote by A.E. Walnofer


A Girl Called Foote by A.E. Walnofer

Publication Date: May 13, 2015
eBook & Paperback; 390 Pages

Genre: Historical Fiction


Young Jonathan Clyde causes mischief for everyone at Whitehall, the stately home of his privileged ancestors. As he matures, however, he comes to despise the vanity and conceit surrounding him.

Misfortune requires Lydia Smythe, an exceptionally clever farmer’s daughter, to seek employment at Whitehall. As a parlor maid, she feels stifled and harried by those over her. Still, she refuses to relinquish her independent mind and spirit.

From the moment Jonathan catches Lydia reading the books she is supposed to be dusting, he is intrigued by this unusual servant. Thus begins a clandestine relationship that is simultaneously amusing, confusing and enlightening. Just as it is evolving into something neither of them expected, an unforeseen truth comes to light, and the two wonder if their unconventional bond will be forever lost.

Set in England in the mid-eighteen hundreds, A Girl Called Foote is the coming-of-age story of two similarly impressive people leading very different lives.

Amazon | Barnes and Noble


Review

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Wow, I was not expecting this book to blow me away like it did! I love it when that happens.

I was immediately drawn to the simple yet alluring cover and the unique title. I thought to myself, why in the world would a girl be called Foote? Ha! You'll be tickled when you figure out why she was called that though. If I wasn't already intrigued by the title and cover then I was definitely hooked once I read the opening scene. It was hilarious!

The book starts off with Jonathan living in Whitehall. At a young age, he becomes heir to the estate after his Father and older brother die tragically. He is sent to school abroad but returns home when he becomes of age.

Lydia Smythe is a clever young girl living with her family on their farm. When her father passes her mother suggests she moves away from the farm and her alcoholic, abusive brother, to work in service. She gets her first job at Whitehall and moves there. She is a lover of books and could read at a young age. When Jonathan finds her reading books in their library he is intrigued by her.

I could not love the two main protagonists more and watching them become close and fall in love was really well written. I loved the notes and repertoire they had together. Lydia is kind and smart and not afraid to speak her mind, and while Jonathan is of a higher station in life he's not pretentious or rude.

In addition to Lydia and Jonathan, there are many secondary characters that will charm you - Ploughman, Wells, Sophie, Mr, Farington and especially Elliott! I really enjoyed the upstairs/downstairs aspect in the book - reminded me a bit of Downton Abbey where we get a peek of the lives of the servants.

I also loved that the book was told by multiple POVs - it felt like I got to know the players better and provided more of a rounded picture. It's obvious that the author has a fantastic sense of humor because there is a lot of witty dialogue in the book, and some laugh out loud moments. I loved everything about this book! You definitely should pick this up and escape into a good book this weekend!

About the Author


A.E. Walnofer spends weekdays mobilizing the soft tissue and synovial joints of patients, and weekends typing out stories that are incessantly brewing inside her head. There are lots of these tales and she hopes to share many more of them with you in the future.

Website | Goodreads

Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, May 4
Review at YA, It's Lit
Review at Probably at the Library

Tuesday, May 5
Review at Gwendalyn's Books

Wednesday, May 6
Review at Nursebookie
Feature at What Is That Book About

Thursday, May 7
Feature at Books In Their Natural Habitat

Friday, May 8
Review at Momfluenster
Review at Passages to the Past

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we are giving away two eBooks of A Girl Called Foote! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 8th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Paperback giveaway is open to the US only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud will be decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or a new winner is chosen.

A Girl Called Foote


Interview & Giveaway: Diane C. McPhail & The Abolitionist's Daughter

Hello, dear readers! I hope you are all staying healthy & happy & reading some great books! Today on the blog I have an interview with Diane C. McPhail. Diane is currently on tour for her great historical, The Abolitionist's Daughter, which I highly recommend!

Hope you enjoy the interview & be sure to enter the giveaway!



Hello Diane and welcome to Passages to the Past! Thanks so much for stopping by today to talk about The Abolitionist’s Daughter!

To begin, can you please tell us a little about yourself and your writing?

I came to writing with many diverse interests in my background. I am an artist, a therapist, a minister, a teacher, and retreat leader as well as a writer. Most of my writing has been in flash fiction and poetry until I encountered the background that led to The Abolitionist’s Daughter.

What inspired you to write The Abolitionist’s Daughter?

An historic story of violent family and community conflict in the “ghost town” of old Greensboro, Mississippi, that I heard all my life, never realizing that the so-called feud between two families was the story of my direct ancestors. My mother died when I was only nine weeks old. In my middle adulthood I visited my uncle in search of knowing who she had been. In an album he showed me, I came upon an old newspaper article about “Bloody Greensboro.” I was astounded to learn that at the center of the violence was my great-grandmother. I had been haunted by her story since childhood without knowing the connection. At that point, I began to write in an effort to make sense of this horrendous story.

What research did you undertake when writing The Abolitionist’s Daughter?

I spent twelve years engaged simultaneously in writing and research. Of course, I turned to traditional examination of library sources on the Civil War, slavery, Abolitionism, the laws against manumission, the shifting role of women during and after the war, books, articles, online resources. The treasure of my research, however, came from the archives at Mississippi State University, where the family Bible, plantation papers, a few letters, and a number of inventory lists gave me an in-depth view into this family and its members.

What would you like readers to take away from reading The Abolitionist’s Daughter?

There are several things I hope to explore with readers: One, the complexity of character and relationships—none of us is all good or bad; we each carry in us some of each. Two, because of that complexity, all situations are multi-determined—making quick judgments questionable. Three, our stereotyped views that simplify history fail to encompass reality—as in the little-known presence of Southern Abolitionists. Four, I hope that readers will fall in love with these very human characters and their story.

What was your favorite scene to write?

I don’t have to think twice on that question. There is a scene in which Emily questions Ginny, the slave companion who has been educated alongside her, about her use of language. In her typical straightforward manner, Ginny addresses the specialness of all people, the devastating history behind Negro language, the nuances of one’s place in a culture, with wisdom and an eye to the future that confronts us even today.

What was the most difficult scene to write?

That is a harder question. There were many that were difficult to write. I think perhaps those involving Adeline and her dead sons, knowing the gut reality of those details, may have been the most heart-rending for me.

When did you know you wanted to be a writer?

In college, I experimented with poetry and even short stories. Most of those, fortunately, have gone by the wayside. But I continued to write poetry, keeping it hidden away in a drawer. I finally shared it with a friend who was a fine poet and he encouraged me. As an artist, I began to combine image and poetry, leading to a major commission to create a thirteen-figure sculpture garden for a large park in Atlanta. Madeleine L’Engle had long been a great influence on me. When I had the good fortune to study with her several times, she convinced me that, indeed, I was a writer.

What does your daily writing routine look like?

My routine is hardly routine. I tend to be a bit erratic in everything I do. I may work all day and into the night on some days and not at all on others. I may write two to four hours for days on end. Then I may not write for a week. Often my writing is constantly interrupted by some research detail that I have to stop and follow down a long trail of new information.

What has been your greatest challenge as a writer? Have you been able to overcome it?

My greatest challenge, one I am comforted to share with other authors in my writing community, is to maintain the courage to believe in ourselves. The publishing industry is not an easy one. Writers constantly face rejection. The average number of agent rejections for a writer is about 100. Most of your favorite books are in your hands because an author persevered. My husband set that 100 as a goal to reach. Each rejection counted as a point toward winning. That was a great metaphor for me. It landed me with one of the best agents and best editors I could hope for.

Who are your writing inspirations?

Madeleine L’Engle, as mentioned, has had immense influence on me. I am also deeply inspired by Cormac McCarthy, Kent Haruf, Delia Owens, and Wendell Berry—to name only a few.

What was the first historical novel you read?

Jane Eyre. I was in fourth grade. Our school had a book fair and we could request a book. When I chose this one, my teacher said it was too old for me. I went home, found it among my grandparents’ books, and have never gotten over that first reading.

What is the last historical novel you read?

The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates: an exceptional reading experience.

What are three things people may not know about you?

One: people generally are surprised that I am actually an introvert; two, I love interpreting in paint the actual sounds and rhythms I hear in music; and three, I still have poems hidden in the drawer I hope no one ever reads.

What appeals to you most about your chosen genre?

History in school never interested me greatly, all those dates and names to memorize. Reading/writing about the reality of people’s lives beyond those dates and names makes even the present more alive to me.

What historical time period do you gravitate towards the most with your personal reading?

Generally 19th and early 20th Century periods: these are recent enough to give me greater understanding of our present times and issues.

What do you like to do when you aren't writing?

First, of course, is painting. In the recent shutdown, I love getting outside in the garden and going for long walks, my iPhone camera always at ready. I am having a wonderful time pouring creativity into sewing masks to give away in the community as needed. I have a large collection of old fabrics that bring me such fun creating these.

Lastly, what are you working on next?

Presently I am working on a novel set in 1900, just at the turn of the century when immense cultural change was in the air. Two women—one in Chicago, one in New Orleans—unknowingly share the devasting loss of their husbands and of their infant sons. When circumstances bring them together through adversity and the opportunities offered by the first all female Mardi Gras krewe in New Orleans, fate intervenes to reveal secrets neither could have anticipated.

Wow, that sounds intriguing! I can't wait to hear more! Thank you for being here with us today, Diane!


The Abolitionist's Daughter by Diane C. McPhail

Publication Date: April 30, 2019
A John Scognamiglio Book/Kensington

Genre: Historical Fiction


In her sweeping debut, Diane C. McPhail offers a powerful, profoundly emotional novel that explores a little-known aspect of Civil War history—Southern Abolitionists—and the timeless struggle to do right even amidst bitter conflict.

On a Mississippi morning in 1859, Emily Matthews begs her father to save a slave, Nathan, about to be auctioned away from his family. Judge Matthews is an abolitionist who runs an illegal school for his slaves, hoping to eventually set them free. One, a woman named Ginny, has become Emily’s companion and often her conscience—and understands all too well the hazards an educated slave must face. Yet even Ginny could not predict the tangled, tragic string of events set in motion as Nathan’s family arrives at the Matthews farm.

A young doctor, Charles Slate, tends to injured Nathan and begins to court Emily, finally persuading her to become his wife. But their union is disrupted by a fatal clash and a lie that will tear two families apart. As Civil War erupts, Emily, Ginny, and Emily’s stoic mother-in-law, Adeline, each face devastating losses. Emily—sheltered all her life—is especially unprepared for the hardships to come. Struggling to survive in this raw, shifting new world, Emily will discover untapped inner strength, an unlikely love, and the courage to confront deep, painful truths.

In the tradition of Cold Mountain, The Abolitionist’s Daughter eschews stereotypes of the Civil War South, instead weaving an intricate and unforgettable story of survival, loyalty, hope, and redemption.

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound


Praise for The Abolitionist's Daughter

"Diane McPhail excavates a nearly forgotten corner of American history and brings it to full, beating life. This is a fascinating and heartfelt look at the kinds of stories that don't always make it into the history books." -Louis Bayard, author of Courting Mr. Lincoln

"A contender, a deeply felt, thoroughly researched story . . . as good as it deserves to be." -Jacquelyn Mitchard, New York Times bestselling author

"Complex, vivid, and emotionally engaging. This is a story of harsh realities written with a tenderness that shines through and honors the account of one woman's struggle to overcome her society's rules and her circumstances in the face of inconceivable devastation. I couldn't put it down." -Carol E. Anderson, author of You Can't Buy Love Like That

"What an impressive book this is! Diane McPhail works a spell on the reader, transporting us to Mississippi in the 19th century, introducing us to a family torn apart by the time and place in which they live. She tells a dark tale, yet it's laced with lyricism and compassion. This is a powerful, imaginative, captivating book-I'd say, even urgent, considering the time we find ourselves in now." -Judy Goldman, author of Together

"A tender, sparkling debut that bears gentle witness to the abominations of slavery and oppression while heralding the grace, power and necessity of righting wrongs and choosing love. McPhail is full of talent and heart." -Ethel Rohan, author of The Weight of Him"

About the Author


Diane C. McPhail is an artist, writer, and minister. In addition to holding an M.F.A., an M.A., and D.Min., she has studied at the University of Iowa distance learning and the Yale Writers’ Workshop, among others. Diane is a member of North Carolina Writers' Network and the Historical Novel Society. She lives in Highlands, North Carolina, with her husband, and her dog, Pepper.

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Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, April 27
Review at Passages to the Past

Tuesday, April 28
Review at Books and Backroads
Feature at I'm All About Books

Wednesday, April 29
Review at Books and Zebras

Thursday, April 30
Feature at Just One More Chapter

Friday, May 1
Review at Gwendalyn's Books
Excerpt at To Read, or Not to Read

Monday, May 4
Review at Brightside Books

Tuesday, May 5
Feature at What Is That Book About

Wednesday, May 6
Review at Robin Loves Reading

Thursday, May 7
Interview at Passages to the Past

Friday, May 8
Feature at View from the Birdhouse

Monday, May 11
Review at 100 Pages a Day

Wednesday, May 13
Feature at Words and Peace

Thursday, May 14
Review at Tales from the Book Dragon

Saturday, May 16
Review at Reading is My Remedy

Monday, May 18
Review at History + Fiction + Adirondack Spirit

Friday, May 22
Review at A Darn Good Read

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we are giving away a copy of The Abolitionist's Daughter! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 22nd. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Paperback giveaway is open to the US only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud will be decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or a new winner is chosen.

Abolitionist's Daughter


Interview & Giveaway: The Night is Done by Sheila Myers

Happy Monday, dear readers! Today on the blog I have an interview with Sheila Myers, who is currently touring the blogosphere for The Night is Done! She stopped by today to answer a few questions for us, and we also have a giveaway so be sure to enter!



Hello Sheila and welcome to Passages to the Past! Thanks so much for stopping by today to talk about The Night is Done!

To begin, can you please tell us a little about yourself and your writing?

I am a professor at a small community college in Upstate, NY where I teach ecology and coordinate the honors study program. I’ve published four novels and have a few in progress. The Durant family saga was my first foray into historical fiction and I believe my background in science assisted in my research. I also have an affinity for writing about the natural world and a majority of the setting for the novels is in the Adirondack mountains during the Gilded Age. People were flocking to the region to escape the pollution wrought by the industrialization of eastern cities.

The Night is Done is the 3rd book in your Durant Saga series. What inspired you to write the series?

I started to research the Durant family saga - after staying in a cabin hidden in the wilderness that was supposedly built by William West Durant for trysts with his mistress. What I thought would be a one book love story/romance, turned into a four-year research journey. This folklore about William and his mistress started me down a path of clues that shed light on the lives of the Durant family and had me visiting the New York Public Library, the Library of Congress, Winterthur Museum, the Adirondack Museum, and England. My one book idea turned into a trilogy.

What research did you undertake when writing the Durant Saga series?

I visited many libraries and museums combing through primary material consisting of letters, papers, and news articles. The most interesting find, however, was a sealed Durant divorce file from 1898, which I was able to find in a Manhattan courthouse and unseal. I was the first to discover the true reason for the Durant divorce which is revealed in The Night is Done.

What would you like readers to take away from reading the Durant Saga series?

How we choose to live our lives is our legacy. Money and prestige won’t matter in the end. What matters is how you treat other people and your family.

What was your favorite scene to write in The Night is Done?

The end when William, in his 80s, meets the people who used to work for him years earlier.

What was the most difficult scene to write?

The court scenes were difficult. I thought about times I’ve watched court scenes on tv and in books and what made them interesting was how people reacted to the questions from the lawyers. I tried to keep the pace moving along and I hope I did that well.

When did you know you wanted to be a writer?

I think I’ve always wanted to be a writer but it took some prodding from a book club friend.

What does your daily writing routine look like?

I do most of my writing in the summer when I am off from work. Throughout the year I spend time doing research and writing ideas in journals. It takes me about a year to think a plot through and another few months of writing to get to a first draft. And then there is the travel. For my novel on submission, I visited the Great Smoky Mountains National Park a few times to gather material and a sense of location. I did that over breaks. It was a beautiful place to visit.

What has been your greatest challenge as a writer? Have you been able to overcome it?

Mostly the time and resources it takes to conduct research. I am lucky that I have a primary job that pays well and allows me the time to do these things.

Who are your writing inspirations?

I enjoy Ann Patchett, James Michener, and one of my favorite books of all time is City of Thieves by David Benioff.

What was the first historical novel you read?

Probably Roots.

What is the last historical novel you read?

Daisy Jones and the Six – what a fun read.

What is one thing people may not know about you?

I open water swimming in a cold Finger Lake in the summer months.

What appeals to you most about your chosen genre?

I think my background in science leads me to be naturally curious and I like discovering new things about people and the world.

What historical time period do you gravitate towards the most with your personal reading?

Lately, it has been the 1970s because I have a work in progress set in this time period. I was pretty young then so it is interesting to realize how much I didn’t know about what was going on around me. For example, I don’t recall the Vietnam War being discussed in our house or impacting us in any way. I don’t remember it being on the tv all the time. But everything I’ve read about tells me this is how it was. This goes to show how oblivious we are in youth.

What do you like to do when you aren't writing?

Yoga and swimming.

Lastly, what are you working on next?

Two novels in progress: The Truth of Who You Are is out on submission. It explores the secrets families keep to protect what they hold dear. Ben Taylor narrates the story of his life, beginning when he is thirteen years old and growing up in the shadow of the Smoky Mountains in Tennessee. His family are farmers who own most of Taylor Valley—land coveted by lumber companies, who want to exploit it, and the U.S. government, which is trying to buy up properties for the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Ben’s father clings to what he owns, including a large patch of old-growth hickory and chestnut trees.

Chapter 29 is a novel set in dual timelines: the 2020s and 1970s. While sorting out the family estate, thirty-two-year-old Eve Preston discovers her deceased mother's novel on a social media writer platform called Author's Pad. Her mother's novel, set in the early 1970s in a fictional town that hosts an Ivy league college embroiled in protests, reveals dark secrets that Eve suspects may be true. But until she can find the missing chapter 29, she and her mother's online fans won't know whether the death depicted in the first few pages of the novel was an accident, or planned.
Based on the movement to launch female study programs on the campuses across the U.S., the novel explores the impacts of the Second Feminist Wave on women both past and present.


The Night is Done by Sheila Myers

Publication Date: August 11, 2017
eBook & Paperback; 260 Pages

Genre: Historical Fiction
Series: Durant Family Saga, Book Three


William and Ella Durant, heirs to a bygone fortune, are recounting the events that led to the Durant family downfall during the Gilded Age. In 1931 William returns to visit the estate he once possessed in the Adirondacks to speak with the current owner, copper magnate Harold Hochschild, who is writing a history of the region and wants to include a biography of William. Simultaneously, Ella is visiting with an old family friend and former lover, Poultney Bigelow, journalist with Harpers Magazine, who talks her into telling her own story. William recounts the height of his glory, after his father’s death in 1885 when he takes control of the Adirondack railroad assets, travels the world in his yacht and dines with future kings. However, his fortune takes a turn during the Financial Panic of 1893 and amid accusations of adultery and cruelty. Ella’s tale begins when she returned from living abroad to launch a lawsuit against her brother for her fair share of the Durant inheritance. The court provides a stage for the siblings to tear each other’s reputation apart: William for his devious business practices and failure to steward the Durant land holdings, and Ella for her unconventional lifestyle. Based on actual events, and historic figures, The Night is Done is a tale about the life-altering power of revenge, greed and passion.

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound | Draft2Digital

Praise

"Myers writes with skill and has chosen well in deeply researching the Durant saga, which remarkably parallels Greek tragedy. It's a truly engrossing story, and Myers does it justice." - Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review)

"Myers satisfyingly concludes her historical trilogy set in the Gilded Age by presenting the detailed downfall of ruthless real estate mogul William West Durant; his exasperated wife, Janet; and his estranged sister, Ella. In 1931, the penniless Durant recounts his tragic life. After inheriting his father's vast wealth and interest in the Adirondack Railroad, William immediately begins to make bad investments. He squanders money on yachts, panders to princes, and builds mansions he can't afford to run, all while hiding assets from Ella. She sues him for her rightful inheritance and tries to overcome discrimination to become a novelist. Meanwhile, Janet, verbally abused and infantilized by William, begins an affair with her doctor. Myers expertly depicts a precarious era soaked in vicious gossip, stained reputations, and ostentatiousness. Readers will enjoy the historical details that bring this Gilded Age soap opera to life." - Publishers Weekly

"While the covers of Myers's trilogy are done in subdued pastels, the pages inside flash with forbidden romance and a family torn apart by greed." - Betsy Keepes, The Adirondack Explorer

"The trilogy of the Durant family is capped by the fascinating final volume, The Night is Done. In a vein of nostalgia, the story ends in William West Durant's last years and closes out a saga of tragic proportions as the vast Durant wealth and privilege is reduced to impoverished circumstances." - Harvey H. Kaiser, author, Great Camps of the Adirondacks

"The builders of the first "Great Camps," the Durant family defined the Adirondack experience during the Gilded Age. Sheila Myer's trilogy of novels chronicling their saga combines great historical research with compelling writing. The Night is Done is the capstone novel of the saga and takes the story to the end of the Durant fortune where bankruptcy and retribution dominate the family's relations. The book is a great read for those interested in American history or the Durants." - Garet D. Livermore, Exec Director, Sagamore Institute of the Adirondacks

About the Author


Sheila Myers is a Professor in Upstate New York and an award-winning author of four novels. When she's not teaching, she spends her spare time writing and enjoying the outdoors. Her essays and short stories have appeared in the Adirondack Life Magazine, History News Network, Crossing Genres, and Women Writers Women's Books blog.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, April 20
Review at Passages to the Past

Thursday, April 23
Feature at I'm Into Books

Monday, April 27
Guest Post at Chicks, Rogues and Scandals

Wednesday, April 29
Review at Locks, Hooks and Books

Friday, May 1
Review at History + Fiction + Adirondack Spirit

Monday, May 4
Interview at Passages to the Past

Wednesday, May 6
Review at Books and Zebras

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we are giving away 6 signed copies of The Night is Done! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 6th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Paperback giveaway is open to the US & UK only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud will be decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or a new winner is chosen.

The Night is Done


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