Interview with Kathleen Shoop & Giveaway of The Strongman and the Mermaid

Happy Friday eve, dear readers! Today on the blog I am super excited to share my interview with Author Kathleen Shoop with you! Kathleen is currently on blog tour with HF Virtual Book Tours for The Strongman and the Mermaid. It's a fabulous book. If you haven't picked it up yet I highly recommend doing so! You can enter our giveaway for a copy of the book and a $50 Amazon Gift Card!


Hello Kathleen! Thank you for stopping by Passages to the Past to talk about The Strongman and the Mermaid!

To begin, can you please tell us a little about yourself and your writing?

Thanks, Amy! I’m so honored to be part of the incredible tours you put together. I write historical, women’s fiction and romance and had my first book published in 2011. The book, The Last Letter, was inspired by family letters and was written as a standalone but so many people wanted to know more about the story that I’m now finishing up book four in that series. The Strongman and the Mermaid is part of the Donora Story Collection which is a set of books joined by the town of Donora. There are some characters that stretch across books, but it’s the historic, infamous town (site of the 1948 Killing Smog) that ties everything together.

What inspired you to write The Strongman and the Mermaid?

The Strongman and the Mermaid is book two in the Donora Story Collection and it was inspired by the lives of Stan Musial’s (one of the best baseball players in history) parents. I am working on a novel about Stan’s childhood (Book 3—The Magician) but didn’t feel as though I should write about him before writing about how his parents came to be married.

What research did you undertake when writing The Strongman and the Mermaid?

Lukasz and Mary Lancos Musial first met in 1910 in Donora, PA. Lukasz had arrived in Donora from Poland and started work in the wire mill. Mary worked there as a nail girl. She also had been working as a housekeeper since she was eight, rowing her father across the Mon River to and from work each day, and doing other odd jobs. She was a tall, athletic girl and Lukasz was short but very strong and also shy according to Stan’s autobiography. Mary’s big personality and his shyness apparently attracted them to each other. My research involved reading many of the Stan Musial biographies, autobiography, the archives in Donora about the town and its people at the time, and also Polish immigrant research. All of these threads are interwoven to create characters that are “real” even if I’m putting them in situations that are fictionalized. I worked backwards building Mary and Lukasz’s character’s from how Stan described them in all the available sources. Life in a steel-town in 1910-13 was difficult. Yet I knew there would be happy, optimistic times that these characters would experience. I did a lot of research on ethnic holiday traditions to bring structure and meaning to the plot and character development.

What would you like readers to take away from reading The Strongman and the Mermaid?

First, I’d like them to be entertained and love the book and its characters! I’d like them to gain or deepen their sense of life for immigrants during the industrial heyday of America. These people did incredible physical labor and fulfilled their dreams at a time when expectations were simpler and the basics in life were both something to strive for and decadent for people who started with nothing. The history and the love story of Lukasz and Mary are powerful and instructive even though fictionalized and imagined using the research paths mentioned above. I hope I did a good, “true,” rendering of what life might have been like for these two people in this particular place at that time.

What was your favorite scene to write?

I had a lot of fun with the scenes involving the way that Lukasz won his passage to America. I smile every time I think of those scenes. I drew from a lot of Polish and American mythology and those things played a big part in those scenes, too. Lots of fun.

What was the most difficult scene to write?

Some of the scenes where Lukasz and Mary were affectionate were hard to write. I wanted to be sure that Lukasz’s “bigness” and strength was conveyed while also conveying that he was shorter than Mary by quite a bit. There’s something so interesting and lovely about two opposites attracting the way they did and portraying that so it was believable was hard for me. Again, I hope I achieved that in a way that makes the reader love it, love them.

When did you know you wanted to be a writer?

Probably in high school. But I was a voracious reader from the beginning and so the seeds were sewn early. My father wrote every day of his life (in addition to his job) so that influenced me seeing the power of words as well. Everyone in my house had their nose buried in books and that really made me love the idea of creating books for others.

What has been your greatest challenge as a writer? Have you been able to overcome it?

Making the decision to publish all my books on my own was a huge challenge, but the freedom that came with the decision has far outweighed the negatives. It’s a challenge still, in that many historical fiction readers are the ones in the bookstores and online less than romance readers, so I feel like I’m missing a bit of the audience I’m aiming for. But It feels good to have control over the stories I tell and with the right people in place to edit, proof, cover design, promote and market, I feel I made the right decision and I see the results over and over again.

Who are your writing inspirations?

Sarah Gruen, Kate Morton, Elizabeth Strout, Geraldine Brooks, Julianna Baggott and so many more!

What was the first historical novel you read?

Gone with the Wind as a kid!

What appeals to you most about your chosen genre?

I love that with historical fiction, everything comes across as unique and new even though I’m reaching back in history to write the story!

Lastly, what are you working on next?

I’m working on The Thief’s Heart (Book 4 The Letter Series), The Magician (Book 3 Donora Story Collection), Hint of Organza (Book 2 Bridal Shop Series), Cul-de-Sacked Series (Women’s fiction serial release coming soon!) and Tiny Historical Stories –little wisps of stories to give away to readers and also sell for a very discounted price so I get content to readers faster than with full length historical fiction!

Woah, you are a busy writer! I'm excited for ALL of them! Thank you for stopping by today!


The Strongman and the Mermaid by Kathleen Shoop

Publication Date: February 28, 2019
eBook & Paperback; 573 Pages

Series: The Donora Story Collection (Book 2)
Genre: Historical Fiction/Saga


Myscowa, Poland—1910
Once upon a time in tiny, rural Myscowa, Lukasz Musial competes in feats of strength against his lifelong nemesis to win passage to America. He leaves behind grinding poverty and despair, to seek the clear blue skies, and better life he sees on a postcard. Settled in Donora’s Polish community, Lukasz secures a coveted job in the wire mill, and is matched to marry Donora’s very own Polish princess. Life is set on course. The American Dream is nearly his.

Donora, Pennsylvania—1910
Mary Lancos is no princess. A tall, athletic girl who loves the water, she spends her days keeping house for families in town, digging coal out of a backyard seam and rowing her father across the Monongahela River for work. Mary is dependable, tenacious, and always ready to help when someone needs her. She dreams of a gas-heated home, a bedroom for each of her future children, and good meals on the table each night. To help make that happen Mary attends local dances, waiting for the few men who are taller than her to ask her to dance, hoping one of them is right for her.

An unexpected Christmas Eve visitor brings bad luck, and Lukasz’s world crumbles. Meanwhile, tension grows at the Lancos home when money is short and Mary’s dreams clash with her parents’ old world expectations. Just when Mary and Lukasz are at their lowest, they find themselves under an odd pink moonlit sky and Lukasz rescues Mary from a fall into frigid river water. The attraction between them is sudden and consuming, turning the pair onto an unexpected path. With mounting disapproval from Mary’s parents, and increased pressure on Lukasz, they must decide if love is enough to risk losing everything else that matters.

Available on Amazon

Praise

Kathleen Shoop has bejeweled this book with her magnificent imagination and impeccable writing. The Strongman and the Mermaid by Kathleen Shoop is a romance that goes beyond looks and settles deep into the souls of readers. Every so often, a love story comes that your heart can't let go. One of those love stories, for me, has been Mr. Darcy and Lizzy in Pride and Prejudice. Now Mary and Lukasz in The Strongman and the Mermaid will stay with me for a long time to come. –Ankita Shukla for Readers’ Favorite

The Strongman and the Mermaid by Kathleen Shoop is a gorgeous story, a gripping romance with a strong setting. The plot structure is unusual and it has beautiful twists. I love stories with great characters and a well-developed conflict and I always want to see characters evolve through the conflict. It is something that this author does impeccably well. The narrative is emotionally rich…The writing is cinematic, punctuated by exciting dialogue. The Strongman and the Mermaid will keep you awake through the night. –Romuald Dzemo for Readers’ Favorite

I was hooked from the very start...The Strong Man and the Mermaid is skillfully plotted and written in beautiful prose. The reader is pulled into a fairytale-like world with strong and memorable characters. The love adventure between Mary and Lukasz is one of the key elements that add to the entertaining potential of this narrative. Kathleen Shoop keeps it real and human, succeeding in creating an emotional connection between the reader and the characters.—Ruffina Oserio for Readers’ Favorite

About the Author

Bestselling author, Kathleen Shoop, holds a PhD in reading education and has more than 20 years of experience in the classroom. She writes historical fiction, women’s fiction and romance. Shoop’s novels have garnered various awards in the Independent Publisher Book Awards, Eric Hoffer Book Awards, Indie Excellence Awards, Next Generation Indie Book Awards and the San Francisco Book Festival. Kathleen has been featured in USA Today and the Writer’s Guide to 2013. Her work has appeared in The Tribune-Review, four Chicken Soup for the Soul books and Pittsburgh Parent magazine. She lives in Oakmont, Pennsylvania with her husband and two children.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads | Pinterest | BookBub

Blog Tour Schedule

Wednesday, May 1
Review at Passages to the Past

Thursday, May 2
Review at Pursuing Stacie
Feature at Comet Readings

Friday, May 3
Review at Bibliophile Reviews

Saturday, May 4
Feature at Book Addict Rambles

Tuesday, May 7
Excerpt at To Read, or Not to Read
Guest Post at Let Them Read Books

Wednesday, May 8
Feature at Donna's Book Blog

Friday, May 10
Review at View from the Birdhouse
Feature at What Is That Book About
Excerpt at Myths, Legends, Books & Coffee Pots

Monday, May 13
Review at Orange County Readers

Tuesday, May 14
Excerpt at The Book Junkie Reads

Wednesday, May 15
Review at 100 Pages a Day

Thursday, May 16
Interview at Passages to the Past

Monday, May 20
Feature at The Lit Bitch
Review at Jorie Loves a Story

Tuesday, May 21
Review at Macsbooks

Wednesday, May 22
Review at Coffee and Ink
Review at Peaceful Pastime
Interview at Jorie Loves a Story
Review at My Reading Chronicles

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we will be giving away a copy of The Strongman and the Mermaid and a $50 Amazon Gift Card! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 22nd. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open INTERNATIONALLY.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud is decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or new winner is chosen.

Strongman and Mermaid


Review: Gold Digger by Rebecca Rosenberg


Gold Digger by Rebecca Rosenberg

Publication Date: May 28, 2019
Lion Heart Publishing
eBook & Paperback; 312 Pages

Genre: Fiction/Romance/Historical/American


One look at Baby Doe and you know she was meant to be a legend! She was just twenty years old when she came to Colorado to work a gold mine with her new husband. Little did she expect that she'd be abandoned and pregnant and left to manage the gold mine alone. But that didn't stop her!

She moved to Leadville and fell in love with a married prospector, twice her age. Horace Tabor struck the biggest silver vein in history, divorced his wife and married Baby Doe. Though his new wife was known for her beauty, her fashion, and even her philanthropy, she was never welcomed in polite society.

Discover how the Tabors navigated the worlds of wealth, power, politics, and scandal in the wild days of western mining.

Amazon | Barnes and Noble


Review

⭐⭐⭐⭐

I have just finished another incredible novel by Rebecca Rosenberg, who is fast becoming a favorite of mine. She writes novels about strong women who defy societal norms (and you all know how I enjoy reading about amazing women) and with Gold Digger we get to meet Baby Doe Tabor.

"She's something, isn't she?"

"Some kind of trouble."

Baby Doe Tabor is well known in Colorado history but I hadn't heard of her until Rebecca's novel. Set in the late 1800's, Gold Digger tells the rags-to-riches story of Baby Doe (Lizzie), a beautiful yet scandalous woman. She was admired by many men and shunned by the women in their social circles. Rosenberg chronicles half of Baby's life - the remaining half of her story will be continued in Rosenberg's next book, Silver Dollar, which releases in 2020. I am also very excited for the 2021 release of her Champagne Widows Series.

I loved all of the historical cameos in the book - Oscar Wilde, Doc Holliday, Presdent Grant & Arthur, the Vanderbilts, and Louis Comfort Tiffany.

I inhaled Gold Digger in two sittings. It was fascinating to read about the mining industry during that time and Baby Doe sure lived an interesting life, which was spectacularly told as only Rosenberg can!

Gold Digger releases on May 28th. Be sure to add it to your TBR!

Praise for Gold Digger

“Rosenberg’s rollicking Western adventure strikes gold with a gutsy, good-hearted spitfire of a heroine and action aplenty.” —THELMA ADAMS, bestselling author of Bittersweet Brooklyn and The Last Woman Standing

"Gold Digger tells the true story of Lizzie 'Baby Doe' Tabor, a beautiful young woman who in 1878 marries the son of a wealthy miner in order to save her family from penury. Shrewd and stubborn, Lizzie fights back-biting Victorian society, wins and loses vast fortunes, and bests conniving politicians in her larger-than-life story. A twisting tale worthy of Mark Twain, with a big-hearted heroine at the center." —MARTHA CONWAY, author of The Underground River

About the Author

A California native, Rebecca Rosenberg lives on a lavender farm with her family in Sonoma, the Valley of the Moon, where Jack London wrote from his Beauty Ranch. Rebecca is a long-time student of Jack London’s works and an avid fan of his daring wife, Charmian London. The Secret Life of Mrs. London is her debut novel.

Rebecca and her husband, Gary, own the largest lavender product company in America, selling to 4000 resorts, spas and gift stores. The Rosenbergs believe in giving back to the Sonoma Community, supporting many causes through financial donations and board positions, including Worth Our Weight, an educational culinary program for at-risk children, YWCA shelter for abused women, Luther Burbank Performing Arts Center to provide performances for children, Sonoma Food Bank, Sonoma Boys and Girls Club, and the Valley of the Moon Children’s Home.

For more information, please visit Rebecca’s website and blog. You can also find her on Facebook and Goodreads. Visit the Facebook page for The Secret Life of Mrs. London.

Blog Tour Schedule

Wednesday, May 15
Review at Pursuing Stacie

Thursday, May 16
Review at Passages to the Past

Friday, May 17
Review at View from the Birdhouse

Monday, May 20
Interview at Passages to the Past

Tuesday, May 21
Excerpt at Donna's Book Blog

Friday, May 24
Feature at Just One More Chapter

Monday, May 27
Review at Orange County Readers

Tuesday, May 28
Excerpt at Kimber Li
Review at Diana_bibliophile

Wednesday, May 29
Review at 100 Pages a Day
Review at Oh, the Books She Will Read

Thursday, May 30
Review at A Bookish Affair
Excerpt at The Book Junkie Reads

Friday, May 31
Interview at Myths, Legends, Books & Coffee Pots

Monday, June 3
Review at A Chick Who Reads

Tuesday, June 4
Excerpt at Maiden of the Pages

Wednesday, June 5
Review at A Book Geek

Thursday, June 6
Review at Comet Readings

Friday, June 7
Review at History From a Woman's Perspective

Saturday, June 8
Interview at Comet Readings

Monday, June 10
Review & Guest Post at Clarissa Reads it All

Tuesday, June 11
Excerpt at Old Timey Books

Wednesday, June 12
Interview at T's Stuff
Review at Proverbial Reads

Thursday, June 13
Review at Cheryl's Book Nook

Saturday, June 15
Review at Suzy Approved Book Reviews

Monday, June 17
Author Spotlight at RW Bookclub

Tuesday, June 18
Review at Books In Their Natural Habitat

Thursday, June 20
Review at A Holland Reads

Monday, June 24
Review at RW Bookclub
Review at CelticLady's Reviews

Thursday, June 27
Review at Mama's Reading Corner

Friday, June 28
Review at Coffee and Ink
Review at Cover To Cover Cafe

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we will be giving away a copy of Gold Digger, a gold facial mask & soap set, and recipe brochure to five winners. Three winners will receive an ebook of Gold Digger.

To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on June 28th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open INTERNATIONALLY.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud is decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or new winner is chosen.

Gold Digger


Interview with Susanne Dunlap + Giveaway for Listen to the Wind

Hello dear readers! Today on the blog I am super excited to be hosting Susanne Dunlap's Listen to the Wind blog tour! Susanne graciously answered some questions for me and we have a chance for you to win a copy of the book!

Enjoy the interview!



Hello Susanna and welcome to Passages to the Past! Thanks so much for stopping by today to talk about Listen to the Wind!

To begin, can you please tell us a little about yourself and your writing?

Hi Amy! I’m so pleased to be here. I write historical fiction that explores women’s role in history, either as famous people or as ordinary people trying to navigate difficult historical times. I write in lots of different periods, from medieval (like Listen to the Wind) to twentieth century (Anastasia’s Secret).

What inspired you to write Listen to the Wind?

In graduate school for music history I learned about the extraordinary history of the women troubadours, or trobairitz, in Languedoc in the 12th and 13th centuries and they fascinated me. From there, I discovered the Cathars and the Albigensian Crusades and I was hooked.

What research did you undertake when writing Listen to the Wind?

So much! I read what books I could find on the subject—the trobairitz aren’t written about very much, but the Cathars have spawned a whole industry of historical and speculative books. Perhaps most importantly, I traveled to southern France and climbed up to the ruins of the famous Cathar castles. It was eerie and sad and inspiring all at the same time.

What would you like readers to take away from reading Listen to the Wind?

I hope readers will develop an interest in these fascinating times and explore the history on their own—and I hope they’ll want to read the next book in the trilogy!

What was your favorite scene to write?

I think the scene where Azalais has to defend the castle was my favorite.

What was the most difficult scene to write?

Hmmm. I’m not sure. Perhaps the scene at Montpezat’s death bed.

When did you know you wanted to be a writer?

I wanted to write a Nancy Drew style mystery when I was about 8. Then piano took over my creative instincts for a while. A high school English/drama teacher I adored told me before I graduated that I had great ideas but I didn’t know how to write, so when I went to Smith I took an expository writing course and that was sorted out, LOL! In my twenties living in London I was besotted with the Bloomsbury set and the redolence of literary history everywhere, and tried to write then. Terrible, pointless stream-of-consciousness stuff. Then I was writing advertising copy for about 10 years, after which I went to graduate school and wrote academic stuff and got lured into history’s snares. This is a long answer to a simple question, but I don’t think I really knew I was a writer until I wrote my first novel that was published when I was 50. I had a lot of life and career changes, triumphs and disappointments, and learning—always learning—before I settled into realizing that writing was what I had been working toward all that time.

What does your daily writing routine look like?

I get up at 5am, and after I’ve done the morning things—dressing, taking my dog Betty out, making a cup of tea—I sit down at my laptop, usually by 6am. That’s my best time to work, for about 2 hours until I have to go to work for a normal 8.5-hour day. We have half an hour for lunch, so I usually sneak 20 minutes of some kind of writing in then. Forget evenings! Even if I didn’t have a significant other I wanted to spend a bit of time with, my brain is mush and I’m in bed by about 9pm. On weekends, I write all sorts of times. Early in the morning, then around chores and social occasions. I’ll be unemployed by the end of June (company I work for is ceasing operations). I’m looking for another job, but secretly hoping I don’t get one for at least a month so I can do tons of writing.

What has been your greatest challenge as a writer? Have you been able to overcome it?

My greatest challenge as a writer is not rushing, not being impatient. I want to get the story down, figure it out. Learning how to edit, the deep craft stuff that’s so important, is an ongoing process. I’ve now transitioned to a process where the initial draft is more or less torture (perhaps why I’m so eager to get it over with), and I love the revising and editing.

And of course, having self-confidence is always a challenge. Feeling worthy. Believing that people will want to read what I’ve written in the end. I think I’m always still surprised when they do!

Who are your writing inspirations?

I think my writing inspirations are, honestly, my hard-working novelist friends and acquaintances who keep going through their own disappointments and triumphs.

What was the first historical novel you read?

I honestly can’t remember!

What is the last historical novel you read?

The last one I finished was Pam Jenoff’s THE LOST GIRLS OF PARIS. I’m currently reading Kris Waldherr’s THE LOST HISTORY OF DREAMS. Both wonderful!

What are three things people may not know about you?

1. I own well over a hundred pairs of earrings.
2. I used to accompany ballet classes to put my dancer daughters through ballet school.
3. I have ten—soon to be eleven—grandchildren and step-grandchildren scattered around the world from Austin, Texas to Hong Kong.

What appeals to you most about your chosen genre?

The opportunity to learn and to bring a historical time/place to life in a way that immerses readers in it. Just losing myself in a period and inhabiting the characters.

What historical time period do you gravitate towards the most with your personal reading?

I don’t gravitate to any particular period. I’m more interested in whatever story fascinates me, and good writing. Has to be good writing!

What do you like to do when you aren't writing?

Go on long bicycle rides (25 miles is the average), read, work in the garden in the summer, text with my daughters and granddaughters.

Lastly, what are you working on next?

I’m about to start editing the next book in the trilogy, but I also have a nearly completed novel about three real-life women artists in 18th-century Paris, before and during the Revolution.

Thank you so much for having me here! It’s been fun answering your questions.

Thank you, Susanne! It was a joy to have you here and I can't wait to read Listen to the Wind!


Listen to the Wind by Susanne Dunlap

Publication Date: April 22, 2019
Bellastoria Press
eBook & Paperback; 388 Pages

Series: The Orphans of Tolosa, Book 1
Genre: Historical Fiction/Medieval


Sent away from their families for their own protection when they were very young, Azemar and Azalaïs become separated when they are forced to flee from the band of outlaws who served as their supposed protectors. Armed only with scraps of memories and the wits and intelligence that have helped them survive brutal conditions, they struggle to find each other again and discover the mysterious past that links them across distance and time. Who are they? And do they hold the secret of the legendary Cathar treasure? All they know is that knights and monks spell danger, and they must find a way to survive at all costs if they are to fulfill their destiny—and preserve their vanishing culture.

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound | Kobo

About the Author

Susanne Dunlap is the author of six works of historical fiction. Two are for adults (Emilie's Voice and Liszt's Kiss, both published by Touchstone books of Simon & Schuster). Four are for young adults (The Musician's Daughter, Anastasia's Secret, In the Shadow of the Lamp, and The Academie, published by Bloomsbury). A graduate of Smith College with a PhD in Music History from Yale University, Susanne grew up in Buffalo, New York and has lived in London, Brooklyn and Northampton, MA. She now lives in Northampton with her long-time partner, Charles, has two grown daughters, three granddaughters, a grandson, a stepson and a stepdaughter, four step-grandsons and one step-granddaughter—that's a total of four children and nine grandchildren!

In her spare time she cycles in the beautiful Pioneer Valley.

For more information, please visit The Orphans of Tolosa website. You can follow author Susanne Dunlap on Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, Instagram, Pinterest, and BookBub.

Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, May 13
Review at Bibliophile Reviews

Tuesday, May 14
Review at Pursuing Stacie

Wednesday, May 15
Interview at Passages to the Past

Thursday, May 16
Review at Historical Fiction with Spirit

Friday, May 17
Review at Bookish Sarah
Review at Comet Readings
Feature at What Is That Book About

Monday, May 20
Review & Guest Post at Clarissa Reads it All
Excerpt at The Book Junkie Reads

Tuesday, May 21
Feature at Myths, Legends, Books & Coffee Pots

Wednesday, May 22
Feature at Just One More Chapter

Thursday, May 23
Interview at Donna's Book Blog

Friday, May 24
Review at Passages to the Past

Monday, May 27
Review at Macsbooks
Feature at The Lit Bitch

Tuesday, May 28
Review at Coffee and Ink
Feature at CelticLady's Reviews
Review & Guest Post at Chicks, Rogues and Scandals

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we will be giving away one copy of Listen to the Wind by Susanne Dunlap! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 28th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open INTERNATIONALLY.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud is decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or new winner is chosen.

Listen to the Wind


Review: The Silent Woman by Terry Lynn Thomas


The Silent Woman by Terry Lynn Thomas

Publication Date: April 11, 2018
HQ Digital
Paperback & eBook; 384 Pages

Genre: Historical Mystery
Series: Cat Carlisle, Book One


Would you sell your secrets?

Catherine Carlisle is trapped in a loveless marriage and the threat of World War Two is looming. She sees no way out… that is until a trusted friend asks her to switch her husband’s papers in a desperate bid to confuse the Germans.

Soon Catherine finds herself caught up in a deadly mixture of espionage and murder. Someone is selling secrets to the other side, and the evidence seems to point right at her.

Can she clear her name before it’s too late?

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | Google Play | Kobo


Review

⭐⭐⭐⭐

A woman heroine AND a woman baddie - YESSSSS!!!

Cat Carlisle is suffering in an unhappy marriage with her husband who works for the Air Ministry. Stuck living with her horrid sister-in-law, she looks for a way to escape so she secretly couriers messages for an old friend of her father's that works as a spy. One day a woman assualts her and she realizes just how dangerous the messages were. Then a murder occurs and Cat must clear her name and find the true killer.

Cat was a wonderful charcter and watching her grow stronger during the book was awesome. Thomas and Annie were fabulous secondary characters as well. I hope they continue to be in the series. Add in a mysterious woman spy, Marlena X and you have one heck of a book!

The Silent Woman was a fast and fun read that reminded me a bit of Killing Eve with the two women against each other. It's about secrets and what people will do to keep them from coming to light, and what a person can become when the chips are against them. I loved every minute of it and I can't wait to read the next book in the series, The Family Secret!

About the Author

TERRY LYNN THOMAS grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, which explains her love of foggy beaches and Gothic mysteries. When her husband promised to buy Terry a horse and the time to write if she moved to Mississippi with him, she jumped at the chance. Although she had written several novels and screenplays prior to 2006, after she relocated to the South she set out to write in earnest and has never looked back.

Terry Lynn writes the Sarah Bennett Mysteries, set on the California coast during the 1940s, which feature a misunderstood medium in love with a spy. The Drowned Woman is a recipient of the IndieBRAG Medallion. She also writes the Cat Carlisle Mysteries, set in Britain during World War II. The first book in this series, The Silent Woman, came out in April 2018 and has since become a USA TODAY bestseller. The Family Secret is slated for release in March 2019. When she’s not writing, you can find Terry Lynn riding her horse, walking in the woods with her dogs, or visiting old cemeteries in search of story ideas.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, April 29
Review at Coffee and Ink
Feature at To Read, Or Not to Read

Tuesday, April 30
Review at My Reading Chronicles

Wednesday, May 1
Review at Pursuing Stacie
Feature at Clarissa Reads it All

Thursday, May 2
Interview at Passages to the Past

Friday, May 3
Review at Orange County Readers
Feature at What Is That Book About

Monday, May 6
Interview at Myths, Legends, Books & Coffee Pots

Tuesday, May 7
Review at Macs Books
Feature at The Book Junkie Reads

Wednesday, May 8
Review at Bibliophile Reviews

Thursday, May 9
Review at Passages to the Past
Review at Jennifer Van Hoy - Instagram

Friday, May 10
Review at Hooked on Books
Feature at View from the Birdhouse

Monday, May 13
Review at Comet Readings
Review & Interview at Jorie Loves a Story

Tuesday, May 14
Review at Chicks, Rogues and Scandals

Wednesday, May 15
Review at The Lit Bitch
Feature at Just One More Chapter

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we will be giving away a $20 Amazon Gift Card! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 15th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open to US only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud is decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or new winner is chosen.

The Silent Woman


Review: Repentance by Andrew Lam


Repentance by Andrew Lam

Publication Date: May 1, 2019
Tiny Fox Press
Paperback & eBook; 308 Pages


France, October 1944. A Japanese American war hero has a secret.

A secret so awful he'd rather die than tell anyone--one so entwined with the brave act that made him a hero that he's determined never to speak of the war. Ever.

Decades later his son, Daniel Tokunaga, a world-famous cardiac surgeon, is perplexed when the U.S. government comes calling, wanting to know about his father's service with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team during WWII. Something terrible happened while his father was fighting the Germans in France, and the Department of Defense won't stop its investigation until it's determined exactly who did what.

Wanting answers of his own, Daniel upends his life to find out what his father did on a small, obscure hilltop half a world away. As his quest for the truth unravels his family's catastrophic past, the only thing for certain is that nothing--his life, career, and family--can ever be the same again.

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound

Praise for Repentance

“Suspenseful, touching, and beautifully written.” -Margaret George, New York Times best-selling author of Elizabeth I and Helen of Troy

“A gorgeous, emotional book. A story of honor and sacrifice. An important, and timely, American story.” -Karin Tanabe, author of The Diplomat’s Daughter and The Gilded Years

“An intimate, revealing story of family secrets, love and honor during a turbulent time in Japanese American history.” -Gail Tsukiyama, award-winning author of The Samurai’s Garden and The Street of a Thousand Blossoms

“Gripping, engrossing, and poignant. Repentance reveals the nature of combat and its affect on men long after the guns fall silent.” -Susumu Ito, 442nd RCT veteran and recipient of the Bronze Star and Congressional Gold Medal

Review

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Wow, this was one emotional and powerful read!

Repentance tells the story of Daniel, a cardiac surgeon, his father, and the 442nd Regimental Combat Team which was made up of Japenese American soldiers during WWII. I read a lot of historical fiction set during the Second World War but Repentance sets itself apart. I have never read about the Japenese American soldiers and what they had to go through to fight for the US. Andrew Lam did a phemonenal job of bringing their story to life, their bravery, and the awful treatment they had.

Author Margaret George called Repentance "suspenseful, touching and beautifully written" and I second all of that! Told in two storylines - present day and back during WWII - readers will have a hard time putting this book down!

Lam's writing is exquisite. I practically flew through the pages! In a sea of WWII novels, Lam has created one that will truly intrigue, educate, and captivate you. Highly recommended!

About the Author

Andrew Lam, M.D., is the award-winning author of Repentance, Two Sons of China, and Saving Sight. His writing has appeared in The New York Times and The Washington Post. Born in Philadelphia and raised in central Illinois, he graduated summa cum laude in history from Yale University, where he studied military history and U.S.-East Asian relations. He then attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, followed by specialty training to become a retinal surgeon. He is an Assistant Professor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and resides in western Massachusetts with his wife and four children.

His newest book is Repentance, a historical novel and riveting family drama entwined with the history of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, a group of Japanese American soldiers who fought valiantly in Europe during WWII while many of their families were incarcerated in camps like Manzanar at home. The 442nd became the most decorated unit in U.S. military history.

Learn more at Andrew Lam's website. You can also follow him on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

Blog Tour Schedule

Wednesday, May 1
Interview at Jorie Loves a Story

Thursday, May 2
Review at Bookish Sarah

Friday, May 3
Feature at What Is That Book About

Monday, May 6
Review & Interview at Passages to the Past

Tuesday, May 7
Excerpt at The Book Junkie Reads

Wednesday, May 8
Review at Pursuing Stacie
Guest Post at Let Them Read Books

Friday, May 10
Feature at CelticLady's Reviews

Monday, May 13
Feature at RW Bookclub

Tuesday, May 14
Excerpt at Myths, Legends, Books & Coffee Pots

Wednesday, May 15
Review at Bookramblings
Feature at Coffee and Ink
Review at Comet Readings
Review at Jorie Loves a Story

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we will be giving away a paperback copy of Repentance by Andrew Lam! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 31st. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open INTERNATIONALLY.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud is decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or new winner is chosen.

Repentance


Review & Giveaway: A Murderous Malady by Christine Trent


A Murderous Malady by Christine Trent

Publication Date: May 7, 2019
Crooked Lane Books
Hardcover & eBook; 336 Pages

Genre: Historical Mystery


For fans of Charles Todd and Deanna Raybourn comes Christine Trent’s second Florence Nightingale mystery.

Cholera has broken out in London, but Florence Nightingale has bigger problems when people begin dying of a far more intentional cause—murder.

The London summer of 1854 is drawing to a close when a deadly outbreak of cholera grips the city. Florence Nightingale is back on the scene marshaling her nurses to help treat countless suffering patients at Middlesex Hospital as the disease tears through the Soho slums. But beyond the dangers of the disease, something even more evil is seeping through the ailing streets of London.

It begins with an attack on the carriage of Florence’s friend, Elizabeth Herbert, wife to Secretary at War Sidney Herbert. Florence survives, but her coachman does not. Within hours, Sidney’s valet stumbles into the hospital, mutters a few cryptic words about the attack, and promptly dies from cholera. Frantic that an assassin is stalking his wife, Sidney enlists Florence’s help, who accepts but has little to go on save for the valet’s last words and a curious set of dice in his jacket pocket. Soon, the suspects are piling up faster than cholera victims, as there seems to be no end to the number of people who bear a grudge against the Herbert household.

Now, Florence is in a race against time—not only to save the victims of a lethal disease, but to foil a murderer with a disturbingly sinister goal—in A Murderous Malady.

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound


Review

⭐⭐⭐⭐

A Murderous Malady is the second book in author Christine Trent's Florence Nightingale Mystery series and though I haven't read the first one it didn't damper my enjoyment one bit.

In Trent's series, Florence Nightingale investigates mysteries, in addition to her role as a nurse. Florence is in London when someone tries to attack the wife of the Secretary of War, who is her friend, and they ask her to help find out why she was attacked. Traveling to the poorest slums in London to investigate she encounters first hand the extent of the recent Cholera outbreak. Racing against time, Florence and others try to find a way to stem the outbreak. All while searching for the persons who attacked her friend.

I found A Murderous Malady to be a quick and fascinating read! I greatly enjoyed the relationship between Florence and her assistant, Mary, and Florence's determination and her unwavering mission for standing up for the sick and poor was inspirational. I can't wait to see what's next for Florence!

If you're looking for a unique read featuring an intelligent and strong heroine, check out A Murderous Malady!

About the Author

Christine Trent is the author of the Florence Nightingale Mysteries, the Lady of Ashes historical mystery series, about a Victorian-era undertaker, and three other historical novels. Christine’s novels have been translated into Turkish, Polish, and Czech. She writes from her two-story home library, where she lives with her husband, four precocious cats, a large doll collection, entirely too many fountain pens, and over 4,000 catalogued books.

Learn more about Christine at www.christinetrent.com. You can also follow her on Facebook and Goodreads.

Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, May 6
Interview at Let Them Read Books
Review & Giveaway at Passages to the Past

Tuesday, May 7
Review at Peppermint Ph.D.

Wednesday, May 8
Review at Proverbial Reads
Review at Impressions In Ink
Excerpt & Giveaway at Old Timey Books

Thursday, May 9
Guest Post at Short Book and Scribes

Friday, May 10
Review at Broken Teepee
Feature at The Book Junkie Reads
Review & Excerpt at Clarissa Reads it All

Saturday, May 11
Review at Donna's Book Blog

Sunday, May 12
Review at A Bookish Affair

Monday, May 13
Review at A Chick Who Reads
Feature & Giveaway at Queen of Random
Interview at Myths, Legends, Books & Coffee Pots

Tuesday, May 14
Excerpt & Giveaway at To Read, Or Not to Read

Wednesday, May 15
Review at Historical Fiction with Spirit
Excerpt & Giveaway at Kimber Li's Blog

Thursday, May 16
Feature at CelticLady's Reviews
Review at History from a Woman’s Perspective

Friday, May 17
Review at The Lit Bitch

Saturday, May 18
Review at Just One More Chapter

Sunday, May 19
Review, Q&A, and Giveaway at Maiden of the Pages

Monday, May 20
Giveaway at Coffee and Ink
Review & Excerpt at Jathan & Heather

Giveaway

I have one paperback copy of A Murderous Malady up for grabs! To enter, please leave a comment below and incluce your email address or an alternate way to reach out if you win.

Giveaway is open to US addresses only. Giveaway ends on May 16th.

Guest Post & Giveaway: The Girl Puzzle by Kate Braithwaite

Today on the blog I am stoked to be hosting a guest post from Kate Braithwaite, author of The Girl Puzzle! Kate is here to talk about Nellie Bly, and we have a giveaway too so be sure to enter!


The Girl Puzzle by Kate Braithwaite

Publication Date: May 5, 2019
Crooked Cat Books
eBook & Paperback; 263 Pages

Genre: Historical Fiction


Her published story is well known. But did she tell the whole truth about her ten days in the madhouse?

Down to her last dime and offered the chance of a job of a lifetime at The New York World, twenty-three-year old Elizabeth Cochrane agrees to get herself admitted to Blackwell’s Island Lunatic Asylum and report on conditions from the inside. But what happened to her poor friend, Tilly Mayard? Was there more to her high praise of Dr Frank Ingram than everyone knew?

Thirty years later, Elizabeth, known as Nellie Bly, is no longer a celebrated trailblazer and the toast of Newspaper Row. Instead, she lives in a suite in the Hotel McAlpin, writes a column for The New York Journal and runs an informal adoption agency for the city’s orphans.

Beatrice Alexander is her secretary, fascinated by Miss Bly and her causes and crusades. Asked to type up a manuscript revisiting her employer’s experiences in the asylum in 1887, Beatrice believes she’s been given the key to understanding one of the most innovative and daring figures of the age.

"Novelist Braithwaite (The Road to Newgate, 2018, etc.) delivers a well-researched and engrossing tale that focuses on female empowerment. A story of grit and perseverance that will appeal to readers interested in the history of women in journalism." - Kirkus Reviews

Available at Amazon


A Hell of a Woman – Elizabeth Cochrane/Nellie Bly

By anyone’s estimate, Nellie Bly was a hell of a woman. Born in Pennsylvania in 1864, she got her break in journalism by writing a letter to her local paper, the Pittsburg Dispatch, challenging the sexist views of one of their columnists who had waxed lyrical about a ‘woman’s sphere’ and his sympathy for fathers with too many unmarried daughters on their hands. The columnist, the Quiet Observer, who would go on to be a lifelong friend to Nellie, had even written “In China they kill girl babies. Who knows but that this country may have to resort to this sometime.” Twenty-year old Elizabeth Cochrane (her real name) was provoked. Her impassioned letter earned her a job and her first published article, The Girl Puzzle, was a direct call for action on behalf of women. Instead of accepting that women had their place in the world, she called for greater opportunities, for recognition that girls were just as smart as boys - and “a great deal quicker to learn,” - and for women to be paid the same wages as men for the same work. That first article was published in 1885.

Nellie Bly was a woman who called out unfairness when she saw it. In her early twenties, travelling through Mexico and sending reports to the Dispatch, she had this to say about what she saw from the train window:

“Three days, from dawn until dark, we sat at the end of the car inhaling the perfume of the flowers and enjoying the glorious Western sights so rich in originality. For the first time I saw women plowing while their lords and masters sat on a fence smoking. I never longed for anything so much as I did to shove those lazy fellows off. As we got further south they had no fences. I was glad of it, because they do not look well ornamented with lazy men.”

She was way ahead of her time in the 1880’s. Nellie wanted a job on a New York newspaper at a time when no editor would employ a woman to write for anything other than fashion or society pages. Struggling to find a job, she interviewed the editors at all the top papers asking them their views on women. Her article, Women Journalists, published in August 1887, doesn’t paint a pretty picture. From Charles Dana, editor of The Sun, who thought a woman could not be relied upon to be as accurate as a man, to Bennett at the Herald who worried that a woman in the newsroom would inhibit the men (!!!), the prevailing attitude suggested Nellie had no hope of succeeding. But only three months later, she had landed a job at Joseph Pulitzer’s New York World - after an adventure, highly dangerous to her physical and mental well-being.

Nellie Bly’s belief that women were just as good as men - and in many ways better - didn’t change as she grew older. In 1913, she took part in the Women’s Suffrage Parade in Washington D.C. and also reported on the inauguration of Woodrow Wilson the following day. In typical Nellie Bly fashion, she sneaked up onto the platform where Wilson would be sworn in only a few minutes later. In the article for the New York Journal she recorded what she thought: “Will you and I,” she wondered, “ever see a woman stand there and take the oath of office?” That makes for interesting reading, some one hundred and six years later.

Nellie Bly was a feminist, an activist, a journalist, a business leader, a philanthropist with a sharp wit with a love of fashion and a great sense of humor. At times, writing about her was very challenging. How to do justice to someone so extraordinary? How to find the real person behind all the action? What made her who she was? What kind of person did the things that she did, with the level of conviction she had, whether she was right or wrong? After all, Nellie Bly was not always right. She was on the side of the Austrians, who were German allies, during World War II. She didn’t always tell the truth – she liked to lie about her age and was prone to exaggeration, for example in 1921 when she claimed to have found homes for thousands of orphans.

I’ve tried, within The Girl Puzzle – a story of Nellie Bly, to ask how Elizabeth Cochrane became Nellie. In the novel, Bly’s secretary Beatrice – something of a Nellie Bly fangirl, much as I am – types up Nellie’s third person account of her time in the Blackwell’s Island Lunatic Asylum in 1887, using her real name, Elizabeth. Anyone can read Nellie Bly’s own first person account of those days in her own words and I hope readers of the novel will do so. But Nellie Bly the reporter would never have described her experience the way Elizabeth can. She wouldn’t and she didn’t tell the full story. But in The Girl Puzzle, it’s all there: what got her to the point of taking on such a dangerous task, what living through those dark asylum days was like, and what happened to her after she was released.

I hope readers will try it, and enjoy spending time with Nellie Bly as much as I have!

About the Author

Kate Braithwaite grew up in Edinburgh but now lives with her family in the Brandywine Valley in Pennsylvania. Her daughter doesn’t think Kate should describe herself as a history nerd, but that’s exactly what she is. Always on the hunt for lesser known stories from the past, Kate’s books have strong female characters, rich settings and dark secrets.

The Girl Puzzle is her third novel.

For more information, please visit Kate's website and blog. You can also connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

Blog Tour Schedule

Sunday, May 5
Review at Passages to the Past

Monday, May 6
Interview at Jorie Loves A Story
Guest Post at Passages to the Past

Wednesday, May 8
Feature at What Is That Book About

Thursday, May 9
Review at Orange County Readers

Friday, May 10
Review at Macsbooks

Monday, May 13
Interview at Bookish Rantings

Wednesday, May 15
Review at Kate Rock Lit Chick
Feature at CelticLady's Reviews

Friday, May 17
Review at A Book Geek
Review at Coffee and Ink

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we will be giving away a signed copy of The Girl Puzzle by Kate Braithwaite! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 17th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open INTERNATIONALLY.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud is decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or new winner is chosen.

The Girl Puzzle


Interview & Giveaway: Repentance by Andrew Lam

Today on the blog I have an interview with Andrew Lam, author of Repentance. Andrew is currently on blog tour with HF Virtual Book Tours and we are giving away a copy of the book, so be sure to enter the giveaway!

I will be posting my review of Repentance later today. Stay tuned!

Here is the interview, hope you enjoy it!


Hello Andrew and welcome to Passages to the Past! Thanks so much for stopping by today to talk about Repentance!

To begin, can you please tell us a little about yourself and your writing?

In my day job I’m a retina surgeon who treats patients going blind from conditions like retinal detachment and macular degeneration, but my other passion is American history. I write historical fiction to draw attention to aspects of our history that are not necessarily well known, but deserve to be. Repentance is my third book and is based on the dramatic true story of Japanese Americans who fought heroically in Europe during WWII, even though many had families incarcerated in internment camps at home.

What inspired you to write Repentance?

I discovered the story of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, a segregated unit of Japanese Americans that fought so heroically in Italy and France that it became the most decorated unit in U.S. military history.

What research did you undertake when writing Repentance?

I have spent my life studying military history and earned a degree in history from Yale before going to medical school. For this book I conducted research using books and memoirs related to the 442nd and also consulted with helpful veterans.

What would you like readers to take away from reading Repentance?

Repentance is a riveting, suspenseful family drama that is closely entwined with the history of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team. It’s the story of a Japanese American war hero with a terrible secret about a mistake he made in the war, and how this adversely affects his family for decades to come. It’s ultimately a tale of sacrifice, honor, forgiveness, and…repentance. It will appeal to readers who like character-driven historical fiction, and anyone interested in WWII history.

What was your favorite scene to write?

The climatic battle scene and emotional revelations that reveal the novel’s biggest secrets at the end of the book.

What was the most difficult scene to write?

The same scene.

When did you know you wanted to be a writer?

During my surgical training. In the midst of that intense period of my life, I still wanted to find a way to share my love of history and the expertise I’d gained from my college studies with others. I also liked being able to be creative and use my imagination at a time when most of my waking hours were spent in the operating room or studying medicine.

What does your daily writing routine look like?

When I’m not in my clinic or operating, I seem to spend almost all my time driving my kids (there are four) to their various activities and sporting events. My “daily writing routine” is to write while “watching” them swim, do gymnastics, and play tennis. The swim meets are the most productive, because they are interminably long, as any parent of a swimmer knows very well!

What has been your greatest challenge as a writer? Have you been able to overcome it?

My writing is completely dependent on finding new ideas that grab and fascinate me. For example, I wrote my first historical novel, Two Sons of China, because I became passionate about WWII in China. For Repentance, I was enthralled by the story of the 442nd. When I’m passionate about an idea my writing seems almost effortless and doesn’t feel like work. The problem is, such ideas are not always easy to come by, and I know if I don’t have intense interest in a topic then my writing won’t be very good. So the challenge is the constant search for the next great idea. Which leads to your next question…

Who are your writing inspirations?

I usually derive ideas and inspiration from reading history books. Films, travel and meeting new people with interesting backgrounds also help spark new ideas.

What was the first historical novel you read?

I read a lot of historical fiction as a child. Probably Rifles for Waite, by Harold Keith, and Across Five Aprils, by Irene Hunt (Newberry Award winner and honor books, respectively), were among my first.

What is the last historical novel you read?

We Were the Lucky Ones, by Georgia Hunter. Excellent book based on one Polish family’s true story of survival during WWII.

What are three things people may not know about you?

My goal is to visit all 400+ National Park sites in the U.S. I’m about halfway there.
My favorite historical novel is The Winds of War, by Herman Wouk.
I love anything written by Ken Follett (Eye of the Needle, Jackdaws, Pillars of the Earth).

What appeals to you most about your chosen genre?

I love historical fiction because it’s a way to convey history in an entertaining and engaging way. It also enables us to make history come alive by showing how historical events affect individuals and families. It allows readers to see themselves, and sometimes consider the decisions they might have made, in another time and place.

What historical time period do you gravitate towards the most with your personal reading?

World War II.

What do you like to do when you aren't writing?

Read history books, travel, try to keep up with my kids.

Lastly, what are you working on next?

Nothing I’m ready to share about yet, but my immediate goal is to make sure I’ve remembered my wife’s list of times and places to pick up the kids so no one gets forgotten. I’m sure plenty of parents reading this know exactly what I mean!

Thank you for hosting me!

Thank you, Andrew!


Repentance by Andrew Lam

Publication Date: May 1, 2019
Tiny Fox Press
Paperback & eBook; 308 Pages


France, October 1944. A Japanese American war hero has a secret.

A secret so awful he'd rather die than tell anyone--one so entwined with the brave act that made him a hero that he's determined never to speak of the war. Ever.

Decades later his son, Daniel Tokunaga, a world-famous cardiac surgeon, is perplexed when the U.S. government comes calling, wanting to know about his father's service with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team during WWII. Something terrible happened while his father was fighting the Germans in France, and the Department of Defense won't stop its investigation until it's determined exactly who did what.

Wanting answers of his own, Daniel upends his life to find out what his father did on a small, obscure hilltop half a world away. As his quest for the truth unravels his family's catastrophic past, the only thing for certain is that nothing--his life, career, and family--can ever be the same again.

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound

Praise for Repentance

“Suspenseful, touching, and beautifully written.” -Margaret George, New York Times best-selling author of Elizabeth I and Helen of Troy

“A gorgeous, emotional book. A story of honor and sacrifice. An important, and timely, American story.” -Karin Tanabe, author of The Diplomat’s Daughter and The Gilded Years

“An intimate, revealing story of family secrets, love and honor during a turbulent time in Japanese American history.” -Gail Tsukiyama, award-winning author of The Samurai’s Garden and The Street of a Thousand Blossoms

“Gripping, engrossing, and poignant. Repentance reveals the nature of combat and its affect on men long after the guns fall silent.” -Susumu Ito, 442nd RCT veteran and recipient of the Bronze Star and Congressional Gold Medal

About the Author

Andrew Lam, M.D., is the award-winning author of Repentance, Two Sons of China, and Saving Sight. His writing has appeared in The New York Times and The Washington Post. Born in Philadelphia and raised in central Illinois, he graduated summa cum laude in history from Yale University, where he studied military history and U.S.-East Asian relations. He then attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, followed by specialty training to become a retinal surgeon. He is an Assistant Professor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and resides in western Massachusetts with his wife and four children.

His newest book is Repentance, a historical novel and riveting family drama entwined with the history of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, a group of Japanese American soldiers who fought valiantly in Europe during WWII while many of their families were incarcerated in camps like Manzanar at home. The 442nd became the most decorated unit in U.S. military history.

Learn more at Andrew Lam's website. You can also follow him on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

Blog Tour Schedule

Wednesday, May 1
Interview at Jorie Loves a Story

Thursday, May 2
Review at Bookish Sarah

Friday, May 3
Feature at What Is That Book About

Monday, May 6
Review & Interview at Passages to the Past

Tuesday, May 7
Excerpt at The Book Junkie Reads

Wednesday, May 8
Review at Pursuing Stacie
Guest Post at Let Them Read Books

Friday, May 10
Feature at CelticLady's Reviews

Monday, May 13
Feature at RW Bookclub

Tuesday, May 14
Excerpt at Myths, Legends, Books & Coffee Pots

Wednesday, May 15
Review at Bookramblings
Feature at Coffee and Ink
Review at Comet Readings
Review at Jorie Loves a Story

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we will be giving away a paperback copy of Repentance by Andrew Lam! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on May 31st. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open INTERNATIONALLY.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud is decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or new winner is chosen.

Repentance


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